Google's Terms of Service

  • This service may collect, use, and share location data DiscussionGenerated through the annotate view
  • The service can read your private messages DiscussionGenerated through the annotate view
  • You agree to defend, indemnify, and hold the service harmless in case of a claim related to your use of the service DiscussionGenerated through the annotate view
  • This service tracks you on other websites DiscussionThis service uses cookies to track you even if you are not interacting with them directly.
  • Limited copyright license to operate and improve all Google Services DiscussionThe copyright license you grant is “for the limited purpose of operating, promoting, and improving” existing and new Google Services. However, please note that the license does not end if you stop using the Google services.
  • The service may use tracking pixels, web beacons, browser fingerprinting, and/or device fingerprinting on users. Discussion“We collect device-specific information (such as your hardware model, operating system version, unique device identifiers, and mobile network information including phone number). Google may associate your device identifiers or phone number with your Google Account.”
  • Google may collect your device fingerprint. Discussion“We collect device-specific information (such as your hardware model, operating system version, unique device identifiers, and mobile network information including phone number). Google may associate your device identifiers or phone number with your Google Account.”
  • There is a date of the last update of the terms DiscussionGenerated through the annotate view
  • Blocking cookies may limit your ability to use the service DiscussionGenerated through the annotate view
  • + You can request access and deletion of personal data DiscussionGenerated through the annotate view
  • Your profile is combined across various products DiscussionGenerated through the annotate view
  • Google can use your content for all their existing and future services DiscussionThe content you post on a particular Google service can be used by Google on other services you may not be aware of.
  • There is a date of the last update of the terms Discussion
  • + Partial archives of their terms are available DiscussionAt http://www.google.com/intl/en/policies/terms/archive/ you can see at least one previous versions of Google’s terms
  • This service uses your personal information for many different purposes DiscussionBasically, information is collected from “third party websites”, “technology”, use of “personal data”, and the data/demographics you choose to provide. The website says they do this in order to make the website more personalized and “useful” to you, but they track you in all ways possible, which is something of concern if personal online privacy is important to you. Further, although they say that they also use information you provide, even if you provide the bare minimum like your name and your age, they use that to find more info on you as well (at least that is my interpretation of their clause).
  • + This service allows you to retrieve an archive of your data DiscussionGenerated through the annotate view
  • Google may stop providing services to you at any time Discussion“Google may also stop providing Services to you, or add or create new limits to our Services at any time.” Google has no obligation from the terms to give you notice in advance or to give a reason for that termination
  • Google keeps the rights on your content when you stop using it DiscussionThe license that you grant to Google on content you upload to their services will continue even if you stop using the services. While this makes sense for some services (e.g. Google Maps) this applies by default to all Google services. Otherwise you need to check each service for ways to remove content and for specific clauses that restrict the license in time.
  • The service is provided ‘as is’ and to be used at the users’ sole risk DiscussionGenerated through the annotate view
  • + When the service wants to change its terms, users are notified a week or more in advance. DiscussionGoogle: changes in ToS
  • Users agree not to use the service for illegal purposes DiscussionEN (quote) : > Do not use our Services improperly. FR (quote) : > N’utilisez pas nos Services de façon impropre.
  • Jurisdiction in California Discussion“The laws of California, U.S.A., excluding California’s conflict of laws rules, will apply to any disputes arising out of or relating to these terms or the Services.All claims arising out of or relating to these terms or the Services will be litigated exclusively in the federal or state courts of Santa Clara County, California, USA, and you and Google consent to personal jurisdiction in those courts.”
  • Google can share your personal information with other parties DiscussionGoogle can share your personal information with other parties. For sensitive information (medical, racial, ethnic, political, religious or sexuality) Google requires “opt-in”. Google can also share or publish aggregated data that does not identify a person

IRS AND PHISHING

Here’s how taxpayers can avoid the hooks of phishing scams

Knowledge and awareness. Those two things can protect taxpayers and their family members from getting caught up in a phishing scam.

A phishing scam is often an unsolicited email or a website that looks like a legitimate site designed to trick users. The scams convince people into providing personal and financial information.  Scam emails can arrive to personal and work accounts on computers, smartphones and tablets. 

Phishing scams often use one or more of these tactics. The scammers:

  • Pose as a trusted bank, favorite retail store, government agency, or even a tax professional.
  • Tell the taxpayer there’s something wrong with their account.
  • Tell the recipient they’re in violation of a law.
  • Tell the taxpayer to open a link in email or download an attachment.
  • Send the taxpayer a familiar looking – but fake – website and ask them to log in to it.

Thieves do these to trick taxpayers into revealing account numbers and passwords. The thieves secretly download malicious software on to someone’s device to collect personal information. The criminal might also try to fool the recipient into sending money to the scammers.

It’s important to remember that the IRS never:

  • Calls to demand immediate payment using a specific payment method such as a prepaid debit card, iTunes gift card or wire transfer.
  • Asks a taxpayer to make a payment to a person or organization other than the U.S. Treasury.
  • Threatens to immediately bring in local police or other law-enforcement groups saying they can have the taxpayer arrested for not paying.
  • Demands taxes be paid without giving the taxpayer the opportunity to question or appeal the amount owed.

When in doubt, taxpayers can always check the status of their taxes by registering at IRS.gov. From there, taxpayers can check their account balance for the current tax year or any previous tax year with a balance due.

Taxpayers who receive an IRS-related or tax-themed phishing email should forward it to phishing@irs.gov. Taxpayers can also report scam letters and phone calls to phishing@irs.gov as well as the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration.